Deep Mono Photography: Blog https://www.deepmono.photography/blog en-us (C) Alan E Taylor. All Rights Reserved. aetaylor@outlook.com (Deep Mono Photography) Mon, 16 Mar 2020 06:39:00 GMT Mon, 16 Mar 2020 06:39:00 GMT https://www.deepmono.photography/img/s/v-12/u193316781-o223498793-50.jpg Deep Mono Photography: Blog https://www.deepmono.photography/blog 120 120 Monos with Impact using Lightroom https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/5/monos-with-impact-using-lightroom This will be a step-by-step walkthrough that describes how to convert a landscape photograph into a high impact 'deep mono' image using Adobe Lightroom. As I always state at the end of each blog entry, this may not necessarily be the correct or accepted way of doing things but it's what works for me. I'm always interested in constructive criticism, so if you have any observations or improvements to this process then please feel free to comment. As this is a walk-through, I will not be going into too much depth about each of the steps, but I will be happy to discuss them in further detail in future posts.

I will start with a photograph taken with a Nikon D300 camera fitted with a Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, which I use for the majority of my shots — it's big and heavy (due to the high quality of the glass) but produces razor sharp images. For this shot, there are no on-camera filters apart from the standard Hoya Pro 1 Protector that I fit to all my lenses (it's cheaper to replace a scratched filter than a scratched lens).

Initial Image

Shutter: 1/100 sec, Aperture: f/5.0, Exposure Bias: -⅔ EV, Exposure Program: Aperture Priority

 

As you can see, Lightroom's initial rendering of this RAW file looks rather dull and flat so the first job will be to breathe a bit of life into it and bring out the details.

In the Library Module I right-click on the RAW file and select the menu option 'Create Virtual Copy'. As the name suggests, this enables me to work on a copy of the image without making any changes to the original file (If you have read my post on RAW Files, then you may realise that I am just creating a new sidecar file to store the information regarding the edits. An added advantage is that if I don't like the changes, then I can just delete the virtual copy, leaving the original safe and untouched).

Create Virtual Copy

 

When viewing the virtual copy in the Library Module, it can be identified by the 'fold' in the lower left corner:

Virtual Copy

 

Now I press the 'D' key to enter the Develop Module. The first job that I need to perform is to correct any distortions that may be caused by the lens, so I select the 'Lens Corrections' panel on the right-hand side of the screen and select the 'Basic' tab and make sure that the 'Enable Profile Corrections' and 'Remove Chromatic Aberration' boxes are checked:

Lens Corrections

Enable Profile Corrections: This option will correct any distortions that are typically apparent when using wide-angle lenses. Lightroom contains a large database of information regarding the mainstream lenses on the market and is smart enough to use the EXIF data from the RAW file to look up the lens that was used to take the shot. It will then automatically apply any corrections that are necessary.

Remove Chromatic Aberration: When using budget lenses, an effect called 'Chromatic Aberration' is sometimes noticeable. This appears as a coloured fringe around the edges of objects, usually around leaves and branches of trees. Although this problem rarely occurs with the Nikkor Pro lenses, I still check this box anyway from force of habit.

 

Next, I need to look at bringing out some of the detail in the sky. I select the 'Basic' panel and drag the 'Highlights' slider all the way to the left (or just click on the number next to it and type -100). This will reveal any hidden detail in the sky, but sometimes there just isn't any so this will be the point where I delete the virtual copy and move on to find another image to work on. If there is any strong shadow in the image then I will move the 'Shadows' slider to the right to recover any lost detail. In this image there is only a small amount of shadow in the foreground trees so I'll just move the slider up to 20, along with moving the 'Blacks' slider to -8 to correct the slight loss of contrast:

Highlights and Shadows

Highlights and Shadows Sliders

 

Hmm, that sky adjustment didn't seem to make a great deal of difference, did it? Don't worry, that's expected — all I was trying to do was identify if there was any detail at all. Now that I can see that there is something there (albeit very faint) I just need to extract it. Beneath the Histogram in the right-hand panel there is a tool called 'Graduated Filter'. I will select this and then drag the cursor from the top edge of the image down to the bottom edge, then adjust the sliders as shown:

Sky Gradient

Improved Sky

 

Okay, that's starting to look better, but it's still a bit flat. This can be fixed by moving the sliders in the 'Presence' tab:

Presence

... and change the 'Tone Curve' to 'Medium Contrast':

Tone Curve

 

That should give enough detail to perform the mono conversion. As a recap, the image has changed from this:

Recap Original

...to this...

Final Colour Version

It may appear over-saturated at this point, but that's fine. Since it is going to be converted to mono, I'm only really interested in the tones, not the colours.

 

There are numerous ways to convert to monochrome, from a simple de-saturation that just discards the colour information but results in a flat image, through to using a specialised third-party filter package that gives total control over the conversion process. I usually use Nik Silver Efex Pro for my conversions, but in order to keep things simple I will convert this image just using Lightroom controls. I will cover Nik Filters in a later blog.

On the 'Basic' panel, I click on the 'Black & White' tab to perform a standard mono conversion:

Black and White Tab

...then drop down to the "HSL / Color / B&W' panel in order to adjust the sliders to give a bit of depth:

B&W Adjustments

 

This should provide a baseline conversion:

Baseline Mono Conversion

 

This is where the real fun begins. In order to make the image 'pop' I need to apply Dodging and Burning. Dodging is the process of emphasising the highlights whereas Burning performs the opposite task of darkening specific areas. The process is a little bit like 'painting by numbers' in that you take your Dodge brush and paint over the areas that you want to highlight. Then switch to the Burn brush and paint over the areas that you want to darken.

I select the 'Adjustment Brush' tool then click on the drop-down arrow next to the 'Effect' option:

Adjustment Brush Effect

From the drop-down list I select the 'Dodge (Lighten)' option:

Dodge (Lighten)

 

This will reset all sliders to zero apart from the 'Exposure' slider which is set to 0.25. In order to add a little sizzle to my pop, I usually push the 'Clarity' slider up to around 20 or 24:

Dodge Settings

 

At the bottom of this panel there are options to control the interaction with the brush. I usually start off with the following settings but may adjust them as I go (Tip: you can easily change the size of the brush while you are using it by using the '[' and ']' keys on your keyboard):

Brush Size

 

It is often easier to zoom in to 1:1 when performing these operations. When the Dodging is complete, I click the 'Done' button in the lower-right corner, then repeat the operation with the 'Burn' brush. Note that there is no need to adjust the 'Clarity' slider with the 'Burn' brush. For simple images this process can be completed in a few minutes, but for more complex landscapes I often spend up to an hour on this 'fine tuning' phase.

I unfortunately suffer from a strange form of OCD, which means that no matter how hard I try, I cannot stop myself from applying a Vignette to all of my images as the very last step:

Vignette

Once complete, the image should have transformed from this:

Final Initial Recap

...to this...

Final Conversion

 

Summary

This was a very quick introduction to a deep mono conversion of a landscape photograph. In future posts I intend to focus in more detail on some of the techniques used here. If you have any questions or requests for more detailed posts, please leave a comment and I will try to address them.

 

 

Standard Caveat

The content of this blog entry, as with all my blog entries, is my own personal opinion. I don't profess to be the fount of all knowledge on any particular subject; I'm just a guy with a camera and a computer, and around forty years experience taking photographs, both film and digital. I am still experimenting and learning, and I've done more things the wrong way than the right way, and from this I have learned what works and what doesn't. To quote Albert Einsten, "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." There may be a great many blogs, books or magazines that take a different view to my own and that's how it should be. There is never any single, definitive way of doing things, but what I write about here is what works for me. If it works for you too, then that's great!

Disclosure: In order to pay for the hosting and upkeep of this site, I have taken the liberty of including links to the Amazon site for any items that might be of interest. Please feel free to ignore them or to just click through to find out further information in a new browser window. However, if you do decide to make a purchase via the link then Amazon will kindly reward me with vast riches beyond my wildest dreams (I wish!), which will enable me to fund my increasingly expensive hobby.

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aetaylor@outlook.com (Deep Mono Photography) Black and White Conversion Landscape Lightroom Monochrome https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/5/monos-with-impact-using-lightroom Wed, 28 May 2014 17:34:06 GMT
Introduction to Landscape Photography: 3 - Composition https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/5/introduction-to-taking-landscape-photographs---3-composition Previous: Introduction to Landscape Photography: 2 - RAW

 

Composition is a slippery creature. There are a great many debates concerning what is or isn't a well-composed image and as tastes change over time, the arguments rage on. There are, however, a few hard and fast rules concerning composition that have stood the test of time and I shall highlight a few of them here that will stand you in good stead when determining how to frame your landscape photographs.

 

Rule of Thirds

The rule of thirds is probably the simplest compositional rule to understand and follow. In fact, quite a few cameras have an option to switch on grid lines to simplify the capturing of images to follow this rule. The basic principal is to imagine lines on the image that divide it into thirds, a bit like a Noughts and Crosses board. Then align your image so that at least one point of interest (the more, the better) either travel along the lines or, preferably, are placed on one of the intersections. In Lightroom, the Develop Module has a tool called the Crop Overlay that allows you to crop and rotate your image while displaying lines that help you to recompose the layout. More on this at the end of this blog entry. Here is an example of the Rule of Thirds overlay:

Rule of ThirdsRule of Thirds

 

Diagonal Method

The Diagonal Method was discovered by Edwin Westhoff in 2006 while researching Rule of Thirds composition. To quote Edwin:

"The technical side of Diagonal Method is rather simple: each 90 degree corner of a work of art can be divided into two angles of 45 degrees. This dividing line is actually called the bisection line (a bisection is a line that divides an angle into two equal parts). It appeared that artists were intuitively placing details which they found important, on these lines with a deviation of max. 1 tot 1,5 milimetre.
I called this the Diagonal Method because these lines are also the mathematical diagonals of the two overlapping squares within a rectangle. People seem to look through pictures in the same way as the artist did; they follow the bisection lines or Diagonals."

"The difference between the existing theories of composition (the Rule of Thirds and the Golden Section) is that the Diagonal Method is not concerned with making “good” compositions, but with finding details which are important to the artist in a psychological or emotional way. On this level the DM is completely subjective. It has nothing to do with placing lines or shapes in a certain location within a frame with the intention of getting a “better” composition. So we can use the DM to find out what the interests of the artist were. The positioning of these details is done in an unconscious manner. That’s why the DM is so exact."

 

There is a detailed explanation of the theory here. Here is an example of the Diagonal Method overlay (note how the lines pass through the eyes of the carvings, as these are the focal points to which the viewer's eye is drawn):

Diagonal MethodDiagonal Method

 

Triangle Method

The Triangle Method is similar in principal to the Rule of Thirds, where at least one point of interest, preferably more, occur on or near a line and/or intersection. Here is an example:

Triangular MethodTriangular Method

 

Golden Ratio

The Golden Ratio is also known as the Divine Proportion and has been used heavily in designs by artists and architects since the Renaissance, and even before that — it is evident in the architecture of the Parthenon, The Great Mosque of Kairouan and, most notably, Leonardo da Vinci's "Vitruvian Man". The ratio is 1:1.618 and approximates the Rule of Thirds grid pattern, although it is much more aesthetically pleasing as it creates a sense of harmony and balance. There is much more information on Wikipedia. Here is an example:

Golden RatioGolden Ratio

 

Golden Spiral

An alternative approach to the Golden Ratio is the Golden Spiral, also known as the Golden Mean or the Fibonacci Spiral. A Fibonacci spiral approximates the golden spiral using quarter-circle arcs inscribed in squares of integer Fibonacci-number side, shown for square sizes 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, and 34:

Fibonacci SpiralFibonacci Spiral

Here is an example:

Golden SpiralGolden Spiral

 

How to use Crop Overlays in Lightroom

From the Library Module, you can enter the Develop Module by pressing 'D' then press 'R' to activate the Crop Overlay tool (or you could even just press 'R' while in the Library Module, which will switch to the Develop Module and activate the Crop Overlay tool at the same time).

To cycle through the overlays, just press the letter 'O'. Certain overlays, notably the Golden Spiral and the Triangle, also have the option of pressing 'Shift-O' to allow you to cycle through different layouts.

If your image does not directly line up with your desired overlay, you can adjust the crop by dragging one of the edges or corners of the image. You may also move the cursor slightly out from an edge or corner in order to rotate the image for a more pleasing composition.

Once you are happy with your composition, just press the 'Done' button in the lower-right corner. Remember that Lightroom edits are non-destructive, so by cropping or rotating you will not lose any of the image data that falls outside the boundaries.

 

Summary

Lightroom contains numerous crop overlay templates that will assist you in selecting a more fitting composition for your image. These overlays are also available with the Crop Tool in PhotoShop CC.

Lightroom has quite a steep learning curve if you have never encountered it before, so I can strongly recommend Scott Kelby's book 'The Adobe PhotoShop Lightroom 5 Book for Digital Photographers', available in both hardback and Kindle editions.

For more advanced tips I recommend Victoria Bampton's book 'Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5 - The Missing FAQ', also available in both hardback and Kindle editions.

 

Standard Caveat

The content of this blog entry, as with all my blog entries, is my own personal opinion. I don't profess to be the fount of all knowledge on any particular subject; I'm just a guy with a camera and a computer, and around forty years experience taking photographs, both film and digital. I am still experimenting and learning, and I've done more things the wrong way than the right way, and from this I have learned what works and what doesn't. To quote Albert Einsten, "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." There may be a great many blogs, books or magazines that take a different view to my own and that's how it should be. There is never any single, definitive way of doing things, but what I write about here is what works for me. If it works for you too, then that's great!

Disclosure: In order to pay for the hosting and upkeep of this site, I have taken the liberty of including links to the Amazon site for any items that might be of interest. Please feel free to ignore them or to just click through to find out further information in a new browser window. However, if you do decide to make a purchase via the link then Amazon will kindly reward me with vast riches beyond my wildest dreams (I wish!), which will enable me to fund my increasingly expensive hobby.

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aetaylor@outlook.com (Deep Mono Photography) Composition Landscape Layout Lightroom Photography Processing https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/5/introduction-to-taking-landscape-photographs---3-composition Fri, 23 May 2014 11:56:00 GMT
Introduction to Landscape Photography: 2 - RAW https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/5/introduction-to-taking-landscape-photographs---raw Previous: Introduction to Landscape Photography: 1 - Sharpness

Next: Introduction to Landscape Photography: 3 - Composition

 

What is RAW?

A RAW file is the digital equivalent of a negative or transparency in a film camera. It is the actual data that was captured by the sensor when the photo was taken, without any in-camera tweaking or tinkering. If you set your camera to shoot JPGs it will still capture the RAW data, then perform some pre-set processing, save the JPG file and then discard the remaining data. What we would like to do is to keep the RAW file so that we can make the processing decisions.

 

The letters R A & W are not an acronym and do not actually stand for anything. It just means that the file contains the unembellished data that the sensor recorded. A RAW file is not even an image file, it just contains the information that an image file can be constructed from. In order to create an image, we need to use a piece of software that runs on a computer that will allow us to manipulate the image data. Don't worry, this is not as complicated as it sounds. Some of the better known software packages include PhotoShop, Elements and Lightroom. The rest of this blog will be based on Lightroom as it is my particular tool of choice.

 

How does Lightroom process RAW files?

Lightroom is a non-destructive image editor. This means that instead of making changes directly to the RAW file, Lightroom creates a separate file called a Sidecar (or XMP) file that contains the edited information. In order to produce a final image, you Export the file which means that Lightroom will analyse the RAW file, apply any editing information in the sidecar file and use this information to produce the final image file. In fact, you can base several images on the same RAW file by creating separate sidecars: say, one for colour, one for B&W, one cropped for square or letterbox format, etc. The data in the original RAW file remains untouched. You could even mark the RAW file as read-only, as nothing should ever need to write to it (though, depending on your operating system and software configuration, your mileage may vary). If you are not happy with with a particular edit, just delete the sidecar file (Lightroom contains a Remove Image option which does just this).

 

Although RAW files can be quite large, the sidecar files are tiny, so there is no great overhead to storing them. For instance, a RAW file from my 12.3 megapixel Nikon D300 is 20Mb, the sidecar file after processing is 7Kb and the resulting exported JPG is 8.4Mb.

 

Using Lightroom, you should never need to directly interact with a sidecar file since Lightroom handles all of this transparently, but it is important to remember the significance of the sidecar as we will be discussing its impact in future blogs when we begin processing images.

 

Summary

Okay, after all that rambling, what should you take away from this? The important thing to consider if you want to be able to process images effectively, is to always shoot RAW (or even RAW+JPG if you're finding it hard to break the habit). In future blogs I will explain how to use Lightroom to manipulate your RAW files for maximum impact.

 

Next: Introduction to Landscape Photography: 3 - Composition

 

Standard Caveat

The content of this blog entry, as with all my blog entries, is my own personal opinion. I don't profess to be the fount of all knowledge on any particular subject; I'm just a guy with a camera and a computer, and around forty years experience taking photographs, both film and digital. I am still experimenting and learning, and I've done more things the wrong way than the right way, and from this I have learned what works and what doesn't. To quote Albert Einsten, "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." There may be a great many blogs, books or magazines that take a different view to my own and that's how it should be. There is never any single, definitive way of doing things, but what I write about here is what works for me. If it works for you too, then that's great!

 

Disclosure: In order to pay for the hosting and upkeep of this site, I have taken the liberty of including links to the Amazon site for any items that might be of interest. Please feel free to ignore them or to just click through to find out further information in a new browser window. However, if you do decide to make a purchase via the link then Amazon will kindly reward me with vast riches beyond my wildest dreams (I wish!), which will enable me to fund my increasingly expensive hobby.

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aetaylor@outlook.com (Deep Mono Photography) Lightroom Photography Processing RAW https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/5/introduction-to-taking-landscape-photographs---raw Thu, 22 May 2014 15:27:14 GMT
Introduction to Landscape Photography: 1 - Sharpness https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/5/introduction-to-taking-landscape-photographs Next: Introduction to Landscape Photography: 2 - RAW

 

This may seem to be a very obvious thing to do: you just point your camera and click the shutter release — simple!

Or is it?

This is fine for a simple snapshot but there are a few more things that you need to take into consideration in order to produce a quality landscape image.

 

Note: This is a fairly simple introduction, so experienced photographers may want to skip this.

 

Tripods

In order to take the sharpest shot possible, you must take a number of precautions to ensure that your camera is as steady as possible. You could achieve this by placing the camera on to a nearby wall or gatepost, or better still use a tripod. Tripods come in assorted shapes and sizes, from small beanbags to large, heavy-duty behemoths that appear to be constructed from lengths of scaffolding. Over the years I have amassed a substantial collection of tripods that cover the whole range. The three that I tend to use on a regular basis are:

1) A Joby GorillaPod

Joby GorillaPod This is a superb little gizmo that is easy to carry and to use, and can be adjusted to just about any position imaginable. I use this in conjunction with a ball head for total flexibility, allowing shots to be taken from angles that would otherwise be difficult to achieve. It is so versatile that I carry it around even when I have a tripod with me, since it can be used in situations where I would struggle to set the tripod up: I have wrapped it upside down from branches of trees and wrapped it around fenceposts while leaning through a hole in a hedge.

 

2) A Slik Pro 340DX

Slik Pro 340DX This is a lightweight tripod that is very easy to carry around, especially when going out for a whole day. The construction is very high quality and the head is fluid and easily adjustable once you are comfortable with the pan and tilt controls. It is fine with smaller lenses, but a little unstable with larger, heavy lenses. The one thing to watch out for is that the rubber feet can work free, especially when using it in muddy environments, but the manufacturer happily sent me a whole pack of replacements when I contacted them about it.

 

3) A Manfrotto 190X Pro

Manfrotto 190 This is the latest addition to my tripod stockpile and it fits the gap between the Slik 340 and my old Slik 88, in that it is heavier and sturdier than the 340 but not as cumbersome and tiring to carry as the 88. I opted for the Light Duty Grip Ball Head rather than the standard pan/tilt head as that also fits neatly between the total flexibility of a ball head and the trigger-regulated control of a pan/tilt. I'm still getting to grips with this one, so I'll keep you posted how I get on.

 

 

Shutter Release

Okay, so you have your tripod set up and your image framed nicely in the viewfinder. What now? Well, unless your tripod is exceptionally secure, the very act of pressing the shutter release will cause a slight movement that will result in a degree of blurring in the image. In order to prevent this there are a couple of options available:

1) Self Timer

The Self Timer built in to your camera, as its name implies, is intended to allow a small time delay so that you can run around to the front and be included in your shot. You can also take advantage of this delay to steady your shot. When using the Self Timer this way, I usually have it set to two seconds so that I can hit the shutter release and have plenty of time for the camera to steady itself before the shot is taken. If you are particularly heavy-handed, you can increase this delay to five, or even ten seconds. On my Nikon D300, the menu looks like this:

Nikon D300 Self Timer Delay MenuNikon D300 Self Timer Menu

2) Cable Release

The preferred way to fire the shot is to use a Cable Release. The name originates from the days when an actual cable was used like a plunger to physically depress the shutter release button. Modern cameras tend to use an electronic firing mechanism, either by having a remote release connected to the camera body via an electronic wire, or via a wireless release. A sample of shutter release mechanisms for various cameras are listed here.

 

Vibration Reduction (VR) or Image Stabilisation (IS)

A large number of lenses, and even camera bodies, have a built-in Vibration Reduction feature (also known as Image Stabilisation). This is intended to allow hand-held photographs to be taken in low light situations and usually produce excellent results. When using a tripod, however, they can cause problems. The mechanism works by detecting vibrations, but in situations where there is no vibration (such as using a tripod or resting the camera on a wall) then this mechanism can actually cause a small amount of vibration and thereby create a small amount of blur in the image. So, if you have a VR/IS lens or body, remember to switch it off when it is not needed.

 

Mirror Lock

This section does not affect compact or mirror-less cameras.

SLR cameras use a hinged mirror to allow the image in front of the lens to be seen through the viewfinder, in a similar manner to which a periscope functions. There is a much clearer explanation here on Wikipedia. When the shutter release is pressed, the mirror flips up to allow the light from the lens to hit the sensor. This action can cause a small amount of vibration which, in turn, can cause a small amount of blur in the image. In order to counteract this vibration, most SLR cameras have an option called Mirror Lock or Exposure Delay. Activating this will cause a short delay, usually a second or so after the mirror lifts but before the shot is fired, reducing any vibrations during exposure. On my Nikon D300 the menu looks like this:

Nikon D300 Exposure Delay Mode Menu

 

Summary

So, which of the above options do I use? All of them, of course!

If you would like further information on how to take professional-quality images in an easy to read form, then I can heartily suggest Scott Kelby's series The Digital Photography Book:

The Digital Photography Book volume 1 Hardcopy or Kindle Edition

The Digital Photography Book volume 2 Hardcopy or Kindle Edition

The Digital Photography Book volume 3 Hardcopy or Kindle Edition

The Digital Photography Book volume 4 Hardcopy or Kindle Edition

The Digital Photography Book volumes 1 to 4 boxed set Hardcopy or Kindle Edition

 

Next: Introduction to Landscape Photography: 2 - RAW

 

Standard Caveat

The content of this blog entry, as with all my blog entries, is my own personal opinion. I don't profess to be the fount of all knowledge on any particular subject; I'm just a guy with a camera and a computer, and around forty years experience taking photographs, both film and digital. I am still experimenting and learning, and I've done more things the wrong way than the right way, and from this I have learned what works and what doesn't. To quote Albert Einsten, "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." There may be a great many blogs, books or magazines that take a different view to my own and that's how it should be. There is never any single, definitive way of doing things, but what I write about here is what works for me. If it works for you too, then that's great!

 

Disclosure: In order to pay for the hosting and upkeep of this site, I have taken the liberty of including links to the Amazon site for any items that might be of interest. Please feel free to ignore them or to just click through to find out further information in a new browser window. However, if you do decide to make a purchase via the link then Amazon will kindly reward me with vast riches beyond my wildest dreams (I wish!), which will enable me to fund my increasingly expensive hobby.

 
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aetaylor@outlook.com (Deep Mono Photography) Capture Landscape Photography Release Sharp Stable Tripod https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/5/introduction-to-taking-landscape-photographs Thu, 22 May 2014 14:06:25 GMT
Now *this* is how you promote an art gallery... https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/4/now-this-is-how-you-promote-an-art-gallery WHAT A MUSEUM DID TO ATTRACT VISITORS...... 
The Rijksmuseum in Holland had an idea: 
Let's bring the art to the people and then, hopefully, they will come to see more - at the museum.

They took one painting of Rembrandts from 1642, "Night Watch" and brought to life the characters in it, placed them in a busy mall and the rest you can see for yourself! 

The slogan 'Our Heroes are Back' is used to announce that, after an absence of one decade, all major pieces in the Rijksmuseum's collection are back where they belong. This is what happens when they suddenly emerge in an unsuspecting shopping mall somewhere in The Netherlands. With the support of main sponsor ING, entrance to the museum is free on the 13th of April from 12:00 to 00:00.

"This Flashmob recreates Rembrandt's Night Watch. It's considered one of the most famous paintings in the world."
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aetaylor@outlook.com (Deep Mono Photography) Flash Mob Night Watch Rembrandt Rijksmuseum https://www.deepmono.photography/blog/2014/4/now-this-is-how-you-promote-an-art-gallery Sat, 26 Apr 2014 09:30:37 GMT